Sembcorp Energy Singapore

Sustainable resource management challenge on Jurong Island

Jurong Island, formed by a merger of seven islands, houses more than 100 companies that generate S$100 billion of annual output. To date, the energy and chemical hub has attracted S$50 billion of investments to the nation.1​

First conceived in 1983, the bold plans and rapid developments on the island present environmental and resource challenges across energy, water, waste and land use. ​

4 key challenges for Jurong Island

Our solutions were designed to help address challenges across these areas:

Energy
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Environmental Challenges

  • Industrial sector will account for 60% of nation’s CO2e emissions by 20202
  • Chemicals and petroleum refining activities will produce over 60% of total sector emissions2
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Economic Challenges

  • Firms to be charged S$5 per tonne of GHG (Green house gases) emitted from 2019; carbon tax is expected to increase to between S$10 and S$15 per tonne by 203010
  • Impact equivalent to increasing the cost of processing per barrel of crude oil from S$5 to S$911
Water
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Environmental Challenges

  • Jurong Island uses more than 40 million gallons of water daily, equivalent to 10% of the country’s total water demand3
  • Non-domestic sector will account for 60%of total water demand by 20304
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Economic Challenges

  • Water is central to the petrochemicals industry and may account for over 30% of operating costs12
  • Water prices will increase by 30% from 1 July 2017 in 2 phases13
Waste
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Environmental Challenges

  • The amount of waste sent for disposal daily has risen 7x since 19705 nationwide
  • Only 6% of plastic waste is being recycled nationwide6
  • Semakau Landfill will reach full capacity by 20357
  • Waste on Jurong Island is expected to grow at 3% annually between now and 20308
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Economic Challenges

  • Rising labour and fuel costs will increase waste management costs for Jurong Island tenants
Land
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Environmental Challenges

  • Since 1986, most coral reefs in Singapore have lost up to 65% of their live coral cover due to land reclamation9
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Economic Challenges

  • Land demand will continue to outstrip supply, putting upward pressure on rents
  • Other innovative land use may require high capex and may be unfeasible for private firms14

Unlocking greater value and enabling sustainability

Taking on the role of a centralised energy and environmental solutions provider, Sembcorp offers deep integration expertise to deliver value for Jurong Island customers. Our services are also designed to enable sustainability across these key resources:

Reduces capital investment for customers so they can better manage risks and focus on their core businesses.
Energy
Ability to harness energy from diversity of fuels, including wood waste, industrial, commercial and municipal waste as well as waste gases from wastewater treatment.
Water
Integrates water supply, wastewater treatment and water reclamation into a ‘closed loop’, minimising water discharge & conserving water resources.
Waste
Unique capabilities to manage entire energy-from-waste value chain, from waste collection to steam distribution.
Land
Centralised energy facilities reduce land requirements, and a single service corridor brings safety and security benefits.

Powering sustainable development on Jurong Island for 25 years and counting

For over two decades now, Sembcorp provides centralised sustainability solutions to address the energy, water, waste, and land use challenges on Jurong Island. Our solutions include power generation, industrial wastewater treatment, conversion of waste into energy, as well as the provision of service corridor solutions that transport and store materials for customers throughout the island. Sembcorp’s unique integrated management of resources help businesses on Jurong Island lower costs, achieve operational efficiencies and meet their environmental sustainability targets.​

What is a
circular economy?

In a circular economy business model, physical resources are recaptured and reused as far as possible. This is different from the traditional linear economy model of take, make, use and dispose.

Sembcorp Energy Singapore

Why pursue a circular economy on Jurong Island?

Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Be environmentally friendly

  • Address key resource challenges with the goal of maximising positive environmental impact​
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Achieve cost savings​

  • Raise energy efficiency
  • Reuse materials wherever possible​
Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Increase business resiliency​

  • Use resources generated within Jurong Island to support demand
  • Businesses on the island are less vulnerable to potential external supply shocks​

How Sembcorp promotes the circular economy on Jurong Island

Sembcorp supports Jurong Island to be a resource-productive and resilient energy and chemical hub by adopting four key concepts.

Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Energy resilience

Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Water use

Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Recovering energy from waste

Resource Revolution on Jurong Island

Optimised land use

Sembcorp supports sustainability on Jurong Island across four key resources

Cogeneration power plants

Cogeneration power plants

Steam boilers

Piped natural gas supply

National grid

National grid

Customers

Customers

Customers

Customers

Customers

Customers

Customers

Incineration plant

Energy-from-waste plants

Energy-from-waste plants

Seawater intake system

Wastewater treatment plants

Seawater intake system

Wastewater treatment plants

Effluent recovery and demineralised water plant

High-grade industrial water facility

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Offering urban sustainability solutions to customers everywhere

Our achievements on Jurong Island as an integrated energy and environmental solutions provider demonstrate Sembcorp’s commitment to doing our part to create a sustainable future.​

As a forerunner of innovation and pioneer of sustainability solutions, our good track record has attracted the attention of sustainability-conscious customers everywhere. To find out how we can help you meet your sustainability targets, contact us today.​

Get in touch

References

  1. The Straits Times (2015), “Jurong Island’s chemical romance”. Click here
  2. National Climate Change Secretariat (2013), Industry Energy Efficiency: Technology Roadmap. Click here
  3. Public Utilities Board (2016), Our Water, Our Future. Click here
  4. Public Utilities Board (2018), “Singapore Water Story”. Click here
  5. The Straits Times (2015), “Efforts to manage Singapore’s waste”. Click here
  6. The Business Times (2018), “Singapore’s plastic recycling rate only 6%; inconvenience one of reasons for not recycling”. Click here
  7. Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources (2018), “Managing our waste landfill”. Click here
  8. AlphaBeta Singapore analysis based on the National Environment Agency (NEA) waste statistics, manufacturing share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and chemical sector share of manufacturing output.
  9. Reef Ecology Lab (2018), “Coral Reefs of Singapore”. Click here
  10. The Straits Times (2018), “Singapore Budget 2018: Carbon tax of S$5 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions to be levied”. Click here
  11. The Straits Times (2017), “Carbon tax likely to impact oil refineries, wholesale electricity prices”. Click here
  12. The New Paper (2017), “Wafer, petrochem industries to be hit hardest by water hike”. Click here. The analysis also considered case studies of selected petrochemical plants around the world.
  13. The Straits Times (2017), “Singapore Budget 2017: Water prices to increase by 30 percent from July 1 in two phases.” Click here
  14. JTC Corporation (2018), “Allocation policies”. Click here
  15. Public Utilities Board (2018), “Singapore Water Story”. Click here

(2018), Population Trends 2018. Click here